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See also: Drug war facts
See also: Hemp library.

Hemp

DRUG WAR FACTS
compiled by Kendra E. Wright and Paul M. Lewin
for Common Sense for Drug Policy, http://www.csdp.org/ 
Updated: January 15, 1999

1. According to David West, Ph.D. , "The THC levels in industrial hemp are so low that no one could ever get high from smoking it. Moreover, hemp contains a relatively high percentage of another cannabinoid, CBD, that actually blocks the marijuana high. Hemp, it turns out, is not only not marijuana; it could be called 'antimarijuana.'" Source: West, David P, Hemp and Marijuana: Myths and Realities, p. 3 Madison, WI: North American Industrial Hemp Council (1998). 2. Although opponents of hemp production claim that hemp fields will be used to hide marijuana fields, this is unlikely because cross-pollination between hemp and marijuana plants would significantly reduce the potency of the marijuana plant. On March 12, 1998, Canada legalized hemp production and set a limit of 0.3% THC content that may be present in the plants and requires that all seeds be certified for THC content. Source: West, David P, Hemp and Marijuana: Myths and Realities, p. 4, 21 Madison, WI: North American Industrial Hemp Council (1998). 3. In a July 1998 study issued by the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Kentucky, researchers concluded that Kentucky hemp farmers could earn a net profit of $600 per acre for raising certified seeds, $320 net profit per acre for straw only or straw and grain production, and $220 net profit per acre for grain only production. The only crop found to be more profitable was tobacco. Source: Tompson, Dr. Eric C., Dr. Mark C. Berger, and Steven N. Allen, Economic Impacts of Industrial Hemp in Kentucky, p. 21, Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research (1998). 4. In a July 1998 study issued by the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Kentucky, researchers estimated that if Kentucky again became the main source for industrial hemp seed (as it was in the past), the state could earn the following economic benefits: Scenario: Main source for certified industrial seeds only Full time jobs created: 69 Worker earnings: $1,300,000.00 Scenario: Certified seeds, plus one processing facility Full time jobs created: 303 Worker earnings: $6,700,000.00 Scenario: Certified seeds, plus two processing facilities Full time jobs created: 537 Worker earnings: $12,1000,000.00 Scenario: Certified seeds, one processing facility, one industrial hemp paper-pulp plant Full time jobs created: 771 Worker earnings: $17,600,000.00 Source: Tompson, Dr. Eric C., Dr. Mark C. Berger, and Steven N. Allen, Economic Impacts of Industrial Hemp in Kentucky, p. iv Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research (1998). -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Available online at: http://www.csdp.org/factbook/ Questions, comments or suggestions for additions and modifications may be addressed to Paul Lewin at: [email protected] To stay informed, we recommend the DrugSense Weekly Newsletter; http://www.drugsense.org/nl/


See also:
See also: Drug war facts
See also: Hemp library.


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